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Saving a great white shark

Everything is better with a good hug

A glowing commendation for all to see

I'm in this with you.

A smol, delicate danger noodle.

Shows the Silver Award... and that's it.

Thank you stranger. Shows the award.

When you come across a feel-good thing.













  1. Go to the JPL identification site, input your location, time, RA and Dec of the object. You’re welcome.

  2. You can’t travel that distance just by Yarkovsky in a few million years. What happens is that Yarkovsky nudges a small main belt asteroid into a gravitational resonance with Jupiter. The planet then takes over and can rapidly change the orbit so that it starts entering the inner Solar system. This can take as little as a million years or so, depending on the initial orbit and the resonance being experienced.

  3. Nicely explained. To be clear, thermal radiation occurs on the dayside as well as the night side of the body. But the thermal inertia means the remitted radiation is in a slightly different direction to the absorbed radiation due to the rotation. The small difference in photon momentum vectors then gives the net change of motion. If the body is not rotating, Yarkovsky doesn’t happen.

  4. Need to go triage hundreds of emails that will have arrived while on holiday next week, and organise first things to do when I get back to work tomorrow.

  5. We get hit by CMEs quite regularly, do you mean high energy/density CME?

  6. Looks like a common buzzard. I don't know which similiar speecies to compare to in the UK, but it's definitely a hawk and not an eagle.

  7. I don't get the bra full of couscous

  8. The Turner Prize - bra full of couscous beats a shark in a tank any day.

  9. Only if somehow you halt your orbital velocity and then fast forward a movie taken over an hour. From a spacecraft in low Earth orbit you would see very little motion as you passed over. From geosynchronous orbit it would be too small to see by eye. OP doesn’t understand how things look from space.

  10. Fledgling swallows. Over the next few weeks their beaks and feathers will become adult, soon after they’ll start their first migration to South Asia/Africa/Central and South America, depending on where you are.

  11. Black Books beats the IT crowd. Probably because Linehan/Matthews were more comfortable with books and booze than tech but they both have those Flann O'Brien influenced flights of pure surrealism. The bit where Bernard escapes from an awkward dinner with Manny's parents by sliding under the table at the restaurant and there's a full bar under there, complete with barman.

  12. Yes but can you switch it off and switch it back on again?

  13. It’s probably your filter. Variable ND filters work by having 2 polarisers back to back. The first polariser polarises the incoming light. The second filter then lets through a varying percentage of that light, depending on the relative polarisation angle between the filters, which you change by rotating it. When the polarisation vectors of the two filters are aligned, you let through maximum light and you have the smallest ND. When the polarisation vectors are at 90 degrees, you let through minimum light and gave highest ND.

  14. You think Jupiter’s bright? Get up before dawn and see Venus rising low down in the East

  15. This puts you in the price range of a 6" dobsonian scope, which sell for 460 $ online. My first scope was a 6" reflector and I had much fun with that one. These scopes usually come with two eyepieces, which carries you through your first steps in the sky. Medium term you should aim to upgrade to a Telrad finder, or at least add a red dot finder, because it makes it so much easier to actually find objects.

  16. A hooded crow! They're closely related to the carrion crow (the all black crow common in England and Wales) and sometimes interbreed but they're different species. Mostly their ranges don't overlap.

  17. Yep, I live in Ireland and they’re much more common than carrion crows. Just as intelligent though.

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