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  1. In May, DDG admitted its supposedly pro-privacy mobile browser wasn't blocking certain Microsoft trackers, while actively blocking other types of third-party trackers by Microsoft and other organizations, confirming findings by data-usage researcher Zach Edwards.

  2. "For anyone who wants to avoid this, it's possible to disable ads in DuckDuckGo search settings," the biz said, adding that it is working on removing support for bat.bing.com with alternative non-profiling ad conversion tracking.

  3. In May, DDG admitted its supposedly pro-privacy mobile browser wasn't blocking certain Microsoft trackers, while actively blocking other types of third-party trackers by Microsoft and other organizations, confirming findings by data-usage researcher Zach Edwards.

  4. "For anyone who wants to avoid this, it's possible to disable ads in DuckDuckGo search settings," the biz said, adding that it is working on removing support for bat.bing.com with alternative non-profiling ad conversion tracking.

  5. In May, DDG admitted its supposedly pro-privacy mobile browser wasn't blocking certain Microsoft trackers, while actively blocking other types of third-party trackers by Microsoft and other organizations, confirming findings by data-usage researcher Zach Edwards.

  6. "For anyone who wants to avoid this, it's possible to disable ads in DuckDuckGo search settings," the biz said, adding that it is working on removing support for bat.bing.com with alternative non-profiling ad conversion tracking.

  7. "For anyone who wants to avoid this, it's possible to disable ads in DuckDuckGo search settings," the biz said, adding that it is working on removing support for bat.bing.com with alternative non-profiling ad conversion tracking.

  8. "It is my belief that we are very likely looking at the tip of the iceberg, and that other US government personnel have had their devices compromised, whether by a nation-state using NSO's services or tools offered by one of its lesser known but equally potent competitors," Schiff said.

  9. But despite cracking down on the notorious Israeli outfit last year, America has been slow to counter Pegasus and similar software being used to eavesdrop on its people. And, in fact, US military contractor L3Harris reportedly was ready to buy NSO Group until the White House raised concerns.

  10. This, of course, is the now-infamous malware that its developer, Israel's NSO Group, claims is only sold to legitimate government agencies — not private companies or individuals. Once installed on a victim's device, Pegasus can, among other things, secretly snoop on that person's calls, messages, and other activities, and access their phone's camera without permission.

  11. NSO also claims the software can only be used "for the purpose of preventing and investigating terrorism and other serious crimes," despite numerous reports from Citizen Lab, Google, and the media of Pegasus being used to spy on journalists, activists, and politicians by their opponents.

  12. NSO also claims the software can only be used "for the purpose of preventing and investigating terrorism and other serious crimes," despite numerous reports from Citizen Lab, Google, and the media of Pegasus being used to spy on journalists, activists, and politicians by their opponents.

  13. This, of course, is the now-infamous malware that its developer, Israel's NSO Group, claims is only sold to legitimate government agencies — not private companies or individuals. Once installed on a victim's device, Pegasus can, among other things, secretly snoop on that person's calls, messages, and other activities, and access their phone's camera without permission.

  14. "While Chromebook shipments have trended down in the past few quarters, there's still opportunity to be had as the pandemic has brought about positive changes to Chrome adoption," said Jitesh Ubrani, research manager for IDC's Mobility and Consumer Device Trackers. One big change is that COVID—19 lockdowns saw schools accelerate their plans to provide one device for each student.

  15. Total shipments of six million were markedly down from the 12.3 million from the same period in 2021, but IDC noted this year's number was still larger than Chromebook shipments before the COVID-19 pandemic and also reflects that existing inventory "is still being cleared out."

  16. If something as simple as a good screenshot is hard to do, what other frustrations might await users?

  17. One thing ChromeOS Flex can't do is run Android apps. Other Chromebooks can, so this is a significant omission.

  18. Google's boot disk creation process is uncomplicated – if you've taken care to select fast media. I didn't. I optimistically dived into my USB stick collection and found one of the required 8GB or greater capacity – but forgot to consider speed.

  19. I already own a 2017 MacBook Air 7.2, which one of my kids retired. Four years of use at school and university had left it dented and a little rattly, but operational – save for a battery that seldom holds more than a few minutes’ charge.

  20. But Intel made it work, produced this stuff, put it on the market… and not enough people were interested, and now it is giving up, too.

  21. No current mainstream OS understands the concept of a computer that only has primary storage, no secondary storage at all, but it's split between a small volatile section and a large nonvolatile section. It's hard to even describe it to people familiar with how current computers work. I have tried.

  22. No more installing OSes, no more booting up. No more apps. The OS sits in memory all the time, and so do your apps. And if you have a terabyte or two of nonvolatile memory in your computer, what do you need SSDs for? It's all just memory. One small section is fast and infinitely rewritable, but its contents disappear when the power goes. The other 95 per cent holds its contents forever.

  23. Since UNIX was first written in 1969, this has become a mantra: "Everything is a file." Unix-like OSes use the file system for all kinds of things that aren't files: access to the machine is governed by metadata on files, I/O devices are accessed as if they were files, you can play sounds by "copying" them to a sound device, and so on. Since UNIX V8 in 1984, there's even a fake file system, called /proc, that displays information about the memory and processes of the running system by generating pretend files that users and programs can read, and in some cases write.

  24. The first computers didn't have file systems. The giant machines of the 1940s and 1950s, built from tens of thousands of thermionic valves, only had a few words of memory. At first, programs were entered by physically wiring them into the computer by hand: only the data was in memory. The program ran, and printed out some results.

  25. Since UNIX was first written in 1969, this has become a mantra: "Everything is a file." Unix-like OSes use the file system for all kinds of things that aren't files: access to the machine is governed by metadata on files, I/O devices are accessed as if they were files, you can play sounds by "copying" them to a sound device, and so on. Since UNIX V8 in 1984, there's even a fake file system, called /proc, that displays information about the memory and processes of the running system by generating pretend files that users and programs can read, and in some cases write.

  26. The first computers didn't have file systems. The giant machines of the 1940s and 1950s, built from tens of thousands of thermionic valves, only had a few words of memory. At first, programs were entered by physically wiring them into the computer by hand: only the data was in memory. The program ran, and printed out some results.

  27. Once operating systems started managing disk drives, a distinction appeared: primary and secondary storage. Both directly accessible to the computer, not loaded and unloaded by a human operator like reels of paper tape or decks of punched cards. Primary storage appears right in the processor's memory map, and every individual word is directly readable or writable.

  28. The first computers didn't have file systems. The giant machines of the 1940s and 1950s, built from tens of thousands of thermionic valves, only had a few words of memory. At first, programs were entered by physically wiring them into the computer by hand: only the data was in memory. The program ran, and printed out some results.

  29. The first computers didn't have file systems. The giant machines of the 1940s and 1950s, built from tens of thousands of thermionic valves, only had a few words of memory. At first, programs were entered by physically wiring them into the computer by hand: only the data was in memory. The program ran, and printed out some results.

  30. The first computers didn't have file systems. The giant machines of the 1940s and 1950s, built from tens of thousands of thermionic valves, only had a few words of memory. At first, programs were entered by physically wiring them into the computer by hand: only the data was in memory. The program ran, and printed out some results.

  31. The first computers didn't have file systems. The giant machines of the 1940s and 1950s, built from tens of thousands of thermionic valves, only had a few words of memory. At first, programs were entered by physically wiring them into the computer by hand: only the data was in memory. The program ran, and printed out some results.

  32. The first computers didn't have file systems. The giant machines of the 1940s and 1950s, built from tens of thousands of thermionic valves, only had a few words of memory. At first, programs were entered by physically wiring them into the computer by hand: only the data was in memory. The program ran, and printed out some results.

  33. The first computers didn't have file systems. The giant machines of the 1940s and 1950s, built from tens of thousands of thermionic valves, only had a few words of memory. At first, programs were entered by physically wiring them into the computer by hand: only the data was in memory. The program ran, and printed out some results.

  34. Intel is a massive organization filled with brilliant scientists, electrical engineers, and software developers. And yet, despite all of this talent, the company is falling behind rival AMD and faces a mounting threat from Arm processor competitors, which have gained a foothold in the lucrative cloud segment in recent years.

  35. Perhaps the more important question for Gelsinger is how do you instill confidence in a corporation that can't ship a product on time to save its life?

  36. Perhaps the more important question for Gelsinger is how do you instill confidence in a corporation that can't ship a product on time to save its life?

  37. Perhaps the more important question for Gelsinger is how do you instill confidence in a corporation that can't ship a product on time to save its life?

  38. Perhaps the more important question for Gelsinger is how do you instill confidence in a corporation that can't ship a product on time to save its life?

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