Low traffic neighbourhoods (LTNs), which use giant planters, barriers and cameras to restrict vehicle access to residential streets, lead to a reduction in traffic volume and nitrogen dioxide pollution both inside their perimeters and on boundary roads

  1. Or you can just use a lot of cul-de-sacs, dead-ends and convoluted roadways that make trying to go through the neighborhood a waste of time. My favorite around here is two dead-ends connected by a footpath.

  2. In many parts of Florida there are neighborhoods where two houses that are connected by back yard would take miles of driving to get to their front yard. So many meandering neighborhoods are like this, not connected in any way by a foot path either, so to get to a store by walking, you'll either have to hop someone fence to make it a 0.2 mile walk or you have to follow a road and make it a 2.3 mile walk.

  3. I think it is to discourage the argument that it is useless in reducing the pollution levels in your street since you’d get it from all the non-restricted neighborhoods all around. Exciting results nonetheless!

  4. Exciting results for sure. This is good news for some neighborhoods but bad news for the neighborhoods without these traffic deterring interventions, that had to absorb the redirected traffic.

  5. "is not a reason not to be concerned?" I can't think of no reason why one shouldn't use as few negations as never possible in no sentence.

  6. We live in another London borough that trialed these recently. They were universally despised by everyone and just caused insane gridlock traffic on other roads.

  7. No - the anti-LTN argument has always been that you shift traffic from the internal roads (which are now only accessible from one end and not usable as a rat run for through traffic), to the boundary roads and that this will increase pollution on the boundary roads.

  8. Low traffic neighbourhoods (LTNs), which use giant planters, barriers and cameras to restrict vehicle access to residential streets, lead to a reduction in traffic volume and nitrogen dioxide pollution both inside their perimeters and on boundary roads, according to a study of three such schemes in London. The findings run counter to claims by anti-LTN campaigners that the zones merely displace traffic and pollution to their boundary.

  9. I've spent the last 20 years slowly moving further and further out of London because, as someone who needs to get to work, London and big cities clearly detest me, my presence, and my method of transport.

  10. The capitol of Slovenia banned cars in the centre. At the time, it was highly unpopular, but today, the decision is overwhelmingly popular among city residents. This is the path we should get closer to.

  11. That little neighborhood should pay for their own roads not rely on general funds to pay for the roads, if they're going to restrict traffic.

  12. No. They have popular support, the voters want sat nav users and short cutters to be on the main roads.

  13. Too bad that those deterrents are being used in high traffic areas - like the main road into a neighborhood and now there's congestion and accidents because there's a planter in the middle of the street and a bus hit it.

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